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Edward W. Lent, Jr.
Lieutenant Colonel, United States Air Force
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From a contemporary press report:

Edward W. Lent Jr., 75, a retired Air Force lieutenant colonel who later worked in the Prince George's County Department of Public Works and Transportation, died May 10, 1998 at home in Camp Springs, Maryland, of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which is also known as Lou Gehrig's disease.

Colonel Lent was born in Patten, Maine. During World War II, he served as a Navy pilot in the Pacific.

He was recalled to military service during the Korean War and retired from the Air Force in 1969. 

While serving in the Air Force, Colonel Lent graduated from Purdue University and received a master's degree in math education at Cornell.

On his military retirement, he joined the Prince George's Department of Public Works and Transportation, where he retired in 1981 as vice chief of urban services.

He had lived in Prince George's County for the last 30 years.

Survivors include his wife of 55 years, Norine Lent of Camp Springs; two children, Edward W. Lent III and Sheila Ann Smith, both of Upper Marlboro; three brothers; seven grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren.


LENT, EDWARD WILLIAM, JR., Lt Col, USAF (Ret.)

On Sunday, May 10, 1998, of Suitland, MD, the beloved husband of Norine E. Lent; loving father of Edward W. (Bill) Lent, III and Sheila Smith; devoted grandfather of seven; great grandfather of 10; brother of Harry and Rachel Lent, Robert and Murial Lent, John and Betty Lent; father-in-law of Teresa Lent. Also survived by many nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. Friends may call at the LEE FUNERAL HOME, INC., Branch Avenue and Coventry Way, Clinton, MD, Sunday, May 31, from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m. A service will be held at 11 a.m., June 1 at Ft. Myer Chapel, Arlington, VA. Interment Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the Multiple Sclerosis Association of America, 1140 Connecticut Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20006.



Posted:12 June 1998 - Updared: 5 April 2004 Updated: 13 November 2005
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