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John Drum
Captain, United States Army
July 6, 1898:

Captain John Drum of Company K, Tenth Infantry, who was one of our soldiers killed before Santiago, was born in Ireland. On December 4, 1864, he was appointed from California to the Volunteer Army as First Lieuenant in the Eighth California Infantry.  He served with that regiment until honorably mustered out on October 24, 1865.  On July 28, 1866, he was appointed to the Regular Army as Second Lieutenant in the Fourteenth Infantry. He was advanced to the rank of First Lieutenant July 31, 1867, and as assigned to the Tenth Infantry, December 15, 1870. On September 15, 1884, Lieutenant Drum reached the grade of Captain, the rank he held at the time of his death.


This letter was written to John Desmond Drum, General Hugh A. Drum's older brother by Captain John Drum on Dec 8 1889 from Fort Union New Mexico just a few years before his death in Cuba.  My father's copy hung in our living room my entire life and my copy sits next to his flag in our living room. My brother has our father's copy on the mantle in his home  The sentiments expressed in this letter still form the core of our family's values. Sincerely, Deirdre Hoedebecke, September 2003.

"My Dear Son:

"By the time this reaches you it will be near your birth-day which on the 15th inst. makes you a man.  You will then have attained your 21st year, and I hope it will reach you in time and find you well both in body and mind.

"I will say here that your mother and myself have done all we could for your education and welfare, and that I know you have appreciated our efforts, and that we will continue to help you until we can see you started on your career.

"As you will soon be your own master I will say a few words to you.  Never forget your Father and Mother.  Never cease to help your Mother if she needs it.  Never forget your brothers and sister, and as you are the eldest be their friend and Mentor.  Stand by them through thick and thin.  Unite them. In union there is strength, and certainly with six of you much should be accomplished if you are one in sentiment and feelings.  I should have put it first, never forget our God or religion.  Keep out of bad company or society.  Be sober, honest, truthful and industrious.  Be slow to take offence, but protect yourself and family from insult.  Be charitable, and always take the part of the poor and lowly not running to extremes.

"You are a native citizen of the greatest and freest nation on the earth. You will have a say in the government more then I ever had, or could have had and I tell you now guard well the freedom handed down to you. Support the constitution as handed down by the fathers of the Republic. Vote as your conscience tells you.  Oppose all measures looking to any change in the government from its present free standard.  Watch men, and oppose them, who would try to break it up or would attempt to take away any of the rights of the poor, lowly or uneducated, for the rich and educated can always defend themselves.  If you should enter political life, try to bring back its tone, and the men who lead to the simple life and the sterling worth of the days of Jefferson, and Jackson, so that riches and luxury may not sap the foundation of our government.  Oppose any man who attempts to stir up religious strife no matter what his politics may be. Never oppose man on account of his religious views if he is otherwise patriotic, pure, hones and a believer in the Republic, and that all citizen have the same rights and are equally protected.

"At last, never forget that you are of Celtic blood and that your ancestors came from Ireland.  Never forget that poor old Mother land, and if you can ever help her, consistent with your duties as an American, do not fail to do so.

"And now I will close by sending you my blessings and wishing you a long and prosperous, honorable and happy life. God bless you my son.
John Drum"


The father of Hugh Aloysius Drum, he was serving with the 10th United States Infantry during the Spanish-American War when he was killed-in-action during the battle of San Juan Hill, July 1, 1898.

He is buried in Section 1 of Arlington National Cemetery. His wife, Margaret Desmond Drum (1847-1927) is buried with him.  His daughter Mary C. Drum (1872-1925) is also buried in the this site.


John Drum of Ireland
Appointed From California, First Lieutenant, 8th California Infantry, 5 December 1864
Honorably mustered out 24 October 186
Appointed Second Lieutenant, 14 United States Infantry, 28 July 1866
First Lieutenant, 31 July 1867
Unassigned 22 July 1869
Assigned to the 10th United States Infantry, 15 December 1870
Captain, 15 September 1884
Killed 1 July 1898 at the battle of San Juan Santiago Cuba.
John Drum (1849 - 1898)

John Drum was born in Killeshandra, Ireland,  on May 1, 1840. He received his early education at school in his home town, as well as receiving a knowledge of the classics from a private tutor.

In 1854 he emigrated to the U.S. He stayed in New York for a short time before moving to California in 1855. During the Civil War he was Deputy U.S. Marshall and was active in the California State Militia. After the war he was elected Journal Clerk of California but by 1886 he had rejoined the army. By 1867 he was made a First Lieutenant in the regular army and was stationed in Texas in 1870. While there he participated in campaigns against the Comanche Indians and against Geronimo and his band of Apaches as well as seeing service along the Mexican border when Mexico and the U.S. were on the verge of war.

Towards the end of the 1880's he was sent on recruiting duty. In 1894 he was appointed Military Instructor at St. Francis Xavier College, New York, where he remained until 1898. He was due to retire but when war was declared he joined his company at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. From there he went on the Mobile, Alabama, Tampa, Florida and eventually to Cuba, where he was killed in action at San Juan, Santiago, on July 1, 1898. His body was interred at Arlington National Cemetery.


CAPTAIN DRUM REBURIED AT ARLINGTON

WASHINGTON, May 27, 1905 The remains of Captain John Drum, late of the Tenth United States Infantry, who was killed at Santiago and buried on the battlefield, were reinterred at the National Cemetery in Arlington today.

The services were conducted by his son, the Rev. Walter M. Drum, S. J. of Georgetown and were private, being attended by members of the family only.


DRUM, JOHN
CAPT 10TH US CT
VETERAN SERVICE DATES: Unknown
DATE OF DEATH: 07/01/1898
DATE OF INTERMENT: Unknown
BURIED AT: SECTION WDIV/  SITE LOT 423
ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY

DRUM, MARGARET WIDOW OF JOHN
DATE OF DEATH: 08/17/1927
DATE OF INTERMENT: Unknown
BURIED AT: SECTION W-W  SITE LOT 423
ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY
 WIFE OF JOHN DRUM - CAPT 10TH US INF

DRUM, MARY D/O JOHN
DATE OF DEATH: 01/19/1925
DATE OF INTERMENT: Unknown
BURIED AT: SECTION W  SITE LOT 423
ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY
 DAUGHTER OF JOHN DRUM - CAPT 10TH US INF


John Drum Gravesite PHOTO

John Drum Gravesite PHOTO
Photos (c) Michael Robert Patterson, September 1999

John Drum Gravesite PHOTO

MC Drum Gravesite PHOTO
Photographs By M. R. Patterson, October 2002

Webmaster: Michael Robert Patterson


Updated: 11 December 1999 Updated: 18 November 2000 Updated: 1 December 2001 Updated: 14 October 2002 Updated: 27 July 2003
Updated: 23 November 2005 Updated: 25 August 2007 Updated: 2 January 2008
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John Drum Gravesite PHOTO June 2003

MC Drum Gravesite PHOTO June 2003
Photos By M. R. Patterson, 28 June 2003