ANC Website Top BANNER 2
Eric Thomas Duckworth
Staff Sergeant, United States Army
Texas State Flag
U.S. Department of Defense
Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs)
News Release

IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. 1207-07
October 11, 2007

DoD Identifies Army Casualty

The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Staff Sergeant Eric T. Duckworth, 26, of Plano, Texas, died October 10, 2007, in Baghdad, Iraq, of wounds sustained when an improvised explosive device detonated near his vehicle.  He was assigned to the 759th Military Police Battalion, 89th Military Police Brigade, Fort Carson, Colorado.

For more information related to this release the media may contact the Fort Carson public affairs office at (719) 526-4143; after hours (719) 526-5500.



The Defense Department has just revealed the identity of a U.S. Army military policeman killed in a roadside bombing in Baghdad.

He's 26-year-old Staff Sgt. Eric T. Duckworth of Plano. A Pentagon statement says he died Wednesday when the roadside bomb exploded near his vehicle.

ET Duckworth PHOTO

Duckworth was assigned to the 759th Military Police Battalion, 89th Military Police Brigade from Fort Carson, Colorado.



A 'Tremendous Leader' Lost
Staff Sergeant on 1st Tour Would Have Come Home Next Month
By Mark Berman
Courtesy of the Washington Post
Wednesday, October 24, 2007

A week before his 27th birthday, family and friends of Eric Thomas Duckworth gathered to honor him for a different reason. They came together yesterday to mourn him as he was buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

Army Staff Sergeamt Duckworth, 26, of Plano, Texas, died October 10, 2007, in Baghdad when a makeshift bomb detonated near his vehicle. He was the 391st member of the military killed in Iraq to be buried at Arlington.

ET Duckworth Funeral Services PHOTO
Brigadier General Rodney L. Johnson comforts Kaylynn Duckworth, 10, stepdaughter of Staff Sergeant Eric T. Duckworth, 
as Duckworth's wife, Sonya, left, holds their son, Michael, 1, and Duckworth's parents, Ila and 
Michael, center, look on.

Duckworth entered the Army at 18, almost immediately after graduating from Clear Lake High School in Houston. He was on his first deployment to Iraq, which began in August 2006 and would have ended next month.

"He wanted to serve his country; he wanted to make a difference," his mother, Ila Duckworth, told the Dallas Morning News last week. "He felt honored to serve his country."

Duckworth's family told the newspaper that he excelled in JROTC during high school and was selected to attend a national ROTC meeting for outstanding leaders. He loved sports, especially the Dallas Cowboys and NASCAR.

He was a friendly and lively guy.

"He made friends easily," his mother told the Morning News. "He was also very much a family man."

Messages posted on the online tribute site, Legacy, were similar. People who knew him described him as a "great man," "tremendous leader" and "extremely dedicated."

"I was a loser, but he was a straight arrow -- a good kid," one friend wrote. "I looked up to him." Another said that "He was a phenominal soldier and an even better leader."

Yesterday, more than 120 mourners gathered under a gray, cloudy sky threatening rain to say goodbye to Duckworth. American flags were given to his widow, Sonya Lynn Duckworth, and his parents. Among the mourners were his daughter, Madison, 4, son Michael, 1, and stepdaughter Kaylynn, 10.

Kaylynn sat in the front row of seats at the end closest to the firing party that was part of the service. She was the first to stand as they prepared to fire their volleys, but as the seven soldiers fired the first of three shots each, she crumbled to the ground. Another mourner knelt to comfort her, but she was visibly shaken by the sound. Secretary of the Army Pete Geren made his way to Kaylynn, kneeling to speak with her.

Duckworth was assigned to the 759th Military Police Battalion, 89th Military Police Brigade, based at Fort Carson, Colorado. During his more than eight years of military service, he received numerous awards, including the Army Service Ribbon and the National Defense Service Medal.

ET Duckworth Funeral Services PHOTO
An Army honor guard carries the casket of Army Staff Sergeant Eric T. Duckworth 
during funeral services at Arlington National Cemetery Tuesday, October 23, 2007

ET Duckworth Funeral Services PHOTO

ET Duckworth Funeral Services PHOTO
A member of the Arlington National Cemetery staff, left, consoles the family of Army Staff Sergeant
Eric T. Duckworth during a funeral services at Arlington National Cemetery Tuesday, October 23, 2007

ET Duckworth Funeral Services PHOTO
Kaylynn Duckworth, the stepdaughter of Army Staff Sergeant Eric T. Duckworth is attended after she 
fainted as Taps was being played during funeral services at Arlington National Cemetery Tuesday, October 23, 2007

ET Duckworth Funeral Services PHOTO
Brigadier GeneralRodney Johnson, left, salutes the family of Army Staff Sergeant Eric T. Duckworth 
during funeral services at Arlington National Cemetery Tuesday, October 23, 2007.

DUCKWORTH, ERIC THOMAS
SSG   US ARMY
DATE OF BIRTH: 10/30/1980
DATE OF DEATH: 10/10/2007
BURIED AT: SECTION 60  SITE 8066
ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY

Webmaster: Michael Robert Patterson


Posted: 23 October 2007 Updated: 24 October 2007 Updated: 18 November 2007 Updated: 13 May 2008
Purple Heart Medal
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

     Bronze Star Medal
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

ET Duckworth Gravesite PHOTO May 2008
Photo By Michael Robert Patterson, May 2008

ET Duckworth Gravesite PHOTO November 2007
Photo Courtesy of Holly, November 2007