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Benton Halstead
Colonel, United States Army
Ohio State Flag
October 8, 1861:

Lewis D. Campbell, Hamilton, Butler County, Ohio. To Governor William Dennison. Letter recommending Benton Halstead of Cincinnati as a suitable person to be conditionally appointed a 2nd Lieutenant for the purpose of recruiting for the 69th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Bears the endorsement of William Beckett, and Israel Williams, members of the District Recruiting Committee for Butler County, Ohio.


197TH REGIMENT, OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY
ONE-YEAR SERVICE

The 197th Regiment was organized at Camp Chase, Ohio, under the last call of the President for volunteers during the Civil War. It was mustered into service, one thousand strong, April 12th, 1865, for one year, under Colonel Benton Halstead, and was the last regiment to leave the state. A majority of the officers and many of the rank and file had seen service in other regiments and were fully equipped and ready for service in the field as soon as mustered in. The regiment left Camp Chase for Washington April 25th, and on arrival was assigned to the Ninth Army Corps and went into camp near Alexandria, Va. It was assigned with the 215th Pennsylvania, 155th Indiana, as the Provisional Brigade.

Soon after this organization was completed the brigade was ordered by rail to Dover, Delaware, and was in camp for one month, employed in guard duty and drill. During the month of June the headquarters of the regiment were at Havre-de-Grace, Maryland, and detachments were sent out to guard the railroads and bridges toward Baltimore. While stationed here the designation of the regiment was changed to the Separate Brigade, Eighth Army Corps.

During the month of July the regiment was stationed at Fort Worthington, near Baltimore, and performed garrison duty continuously until ordered to Ohio to be mustered out. But one Jerome Township soldier served in this regiment, Emanuel Lape.

The regiment was composed of a splendid body of men, well drilled and disciplined, who were anxious for service in the field, but the war closed just as the regiment was mustered into service and before it reached the front. The loss by death was eighteen. The regiment was mustered out at Tod Barracks, Columbus, Ohio, August 6th, 1865.



COLONEL BENTON HALSTEAD

WASHINGTON, February 26, 1919 - Colonel Benton Halstead, said to be the inventor of the first working typewriter, and a member of the staff of General Sherman during the March to the Sea, died today at his home here.  He is survived by his wife and one son, Colonel Laurence Halstead, Chief of the Bureau of Operations of the First American Army in France.

Colonel Halstead was born near Cincinnati seventy-four years ago, and at the outbreakof the Civil War organized his own Company, which became part of the 69th Ohio Volunteers.

Webmaster: Michael Robert Patterson



HALSTEAD, BENTON
COL 197 OHIO INF
VETERAN SERVICE DATES: Unknown
DATE OF DEATH: 02/26/1919
DATE OF INTERMENT: Unknown
BURIED AT:   SITE 65
ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY

HALSTEAD, LENORE D/O BENTON
DATE OF DEATH: 12/20/1918
DATE OF INTERMENT: Unknown
BURIED AT: SECTION FT MY  SITE 65
ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY
 DAUGHTER OF BENTON HALSTEAD - COL 197 OHIO INF

HALSTEAD, ROWENA W/O BENTON
DATE OF BIRTH: 12/12/1856
DATE OF DEATH: 05/03/1946
DATE OF INTERMENT: 05/06/1946
BURIED AT: SECTION FT MY  SITE 65
ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY


Posted: 15 May 2005 Updated: 14 October 2007

 Benton Halstead Gravesite PHOTO October 2007
Photo By: M. R. Patterson, October 2007